cover image: The Future of Work for Australian Graduates: - The Changing Landscape of University-

20.500.12592/6n02n2

The Future of Work for Australian Graduates: - The Changing Landscape of University-

9 Oct 2019

The Future of Work for Australian Graduates The Future of Work for Australian Graduates: The Changing Landscape of University- Employment Transitions in Australia By Alison Pennington and Dr Jim Stanford The Centre for Future Work at the Australia Institute October 2019 The Future of Work for Australian Graduates 1 About The Australia Institute About the Centre for Future Work The Australia Instit. [...] This report provides an overview of the prospects and challenges faced by future university graduates, in the context of major changes expected in the world of work – including the application of new technologies, evolving requirements of employers for new skills and capabilities, new business models and forms of employment, and other challenges. [...] Work on the report involved the following major components: Compilation and analysis of quantitative data from multiple official sources: including the ABS; the OECD; the Australian Graduate Survey (2000–15) and Graduate Outcomes Survey (2016–18); the Commonwealth Department of Education and Training; the Commonwealth Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business; and the Workplace. [...] The Future of Work for Australian Graduates 8 Review of extant literature and research on the impacts of automation on work, changing work organisation practices, the industry and occupational composition of Australia’s current and future workforce, the evolution of graduate future skills, and the university sector’s initiatives in the area of employment transitions for graduates. [...] The slow pace of capital investment (especially in machinery and equipment), the poor innovation record of Australian businesses, the concentration of the national economy in extraction of non-renewable resources (sectors which tend to demonstrate falling productivity over time as resources are depleted), and the continued creation of large numbers of jobs in relatively low- productivity private s.

Authors

Jim Stanford

Pages
107
Published in
Australia

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