Coherent Identifier About this item: 20.500.12592/64v46n

Rikinobu Funasugi The Understanding of the United States Government Regarding the Geography of Takes

26 August 2022

Summary

The Understanding of the United States Government Regarding the Geography of Takeshima Immediately After the San Francisco Peace Treaty Came into Effect: Drawing on US Government-Issued Aeronautical Charts Published in 1953 and 1954 The Understanding of the United States Government Regarding the Geography of Takeshima Immediately After the San Francisco Peace Treaty Came into Effect: Drawing on US. [...] (2) Views of the governments of Japan and the Republic of Korea on the treatment of Takeshima in the San Francisco Peace Treaty Research carried out over many years by Takashi Tsukamoto, a former professor at Tokai University, has already made clear the treatment of Takeshima in the San Francisco Peace Treaty.8 The views of the Japanese government are given as follows on the website of the Ministr. [...] We can confirm the current views of the Korean government regarding the San Francisco Peace Treaty via the informational internet page “Dokdo, Beautiful Island of Korea,” hosted on the official website of the Korean Ministry for Foreign Affairs.13 The section “Why Dokdo is Korean Territory” contains the following account of the “Conclusion of the Treaty of Peace with Japan”: “The Treaty of Peace w. [...] 14 K orean and some Japanese scholars have used the inclusion of present-day Takeshima on some nautical charts published by Japan’s Hydrographic Department during the Meiji Era (1868-1912), among them the Map of the East Coast of Korea (Chosen higashi kaigan-zu) and Map of the Entire Coast of Korea (Chosen zengan) to argue that the Japanese government of the time recognized the islands as part of. [...] There is no marking to indicate international boundaries in the vicinity of Takeshima, where the only text is the Western (French) name of “Liancourt Rocks,” the number 515 indicating the elevation of the highest point in feet, and the warning “Danger Area,” presumably indicating the presence of a US military training area (Fig.

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