MOBILE NAMIBIA: MIGRATION TRENDS - AND ATTITUDES - T S A M P
Coherent Identifier About this item: 20.500.12592/sjm1cs

MOBILE NAMIBIA: MIGRATION TRENDS - AND ATTITUDES - T S A M P

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Reliance on wage income therefore ensured a sup- ply of labour to the white-owned farms, the mines and the towns.6 In many ways, apartheid in Namibia was tougher than in South Africa, largely because of the small size of the population and the remoteness of the country. [...] The 1997 population of Windhoek was about 200,000 people.19 Most of the population growth is taking place in Katutura, the large township located to the north-west of the city, where about 60% of the urban area’s population live on about 20% of the urban area’s land. [...] Central Katutura is the older more established part of the township; the North-West areas, where most of the informal, shanty housing is located and much of the growth is tak- ing place, surrounds central Katutura to the north and west. [...] In the early 1990s, Windhoek accounted for 51% of national manufacturing activity, 94% of communications and transport, 96% of utilities, 82% of business and financial services, 68% of social and community services, and 56% of construction and trade activities.24 The Namibian development budgets for recent years also reflect the dominance of the central region and Windhoek. [...] These four areas represent the socio-economic, eth- nic, and demographic diversity of the city.54 The number of interviews conducted in each of the four areas of Windhoek was based on the size of the area’s population with almost half of the interviews being carried MIGRATION POLICY SERIES NO.

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